Head Immobilizers Along with Other Required Lifeguard Equipment

Head Immobilizers Along with Other Required Lifeguard Equipment

Many people consider the gear lifeguards use to be very minimal, as they commonly only use their lifeguard chair, a megaphone or whistle and their bathing suit. Nevertheless, that does not even come close to the full range of what is needed for a lifeguard to be totally prepared to really do their job and be ready to respond in the case of an actual emergency situation. In both terms of lifeguard training and accessories, a lifeguard consistently has to be prepared for any predicament that arise even though most of the time they don’t in fact have to go into the water. The tools required for any efficient and effective lifeguard operation includes everything from flotation and transport devices and several forms of medical equipment, such as a head immobilizer. When individuals are not able to swim on their own, a lifeguard’s flotation device will help getting the injured back to land where they can receive treatment.


A rescue tube, a straight, narrow piece of vinyl coated foam with an attached strap, is a form of floatation device that you will see lifeguards work with. They are easy to swim with to get to the person needing help and then be wrapped around the person to tow or pull them back to the shoreline. A ring buoy is yet another well-known type of floatation device and is normally thrown to someone in need so they can hold onto it or put it around themselves to be pulled out of the water. The moment the lifeguards have safely removed the injured from the water, transfer gear will be utilized for further mobility. In an effort to move a person without causing extra trauma or exacerbating the issues further it is absolutely essential that a lifeguard have the proper medical training. A spine board is frequently implemented. This plastic board typically long and wide enough for the average adult’s body to fit onto it, and features straps to hold an individual in place for easy and safe transportation from the pool or beach area to a place where they can receive proper attention and care. With the attached handles, at least two people will be needed to pick up the board, one on either end.

A head immobilizer will probably be appropriate if the lifeguard suspects any sort of back injury. This critical piece of equipment prevents the head from moving whether during transfer or even when the person is lying still to prevent further damage to the very sensitive spinal cord. An immobilizer is used by setting two foam blocks on either side of the person’s head after which it is secured via straps at the top and bottom of the head, essentially at the forehead and at the chin. Back injuries can be extremely critical so the ability for a lifeguard to be properly trained and have sufficient and prompt access to a head immobilizer is a must. If there is question at all as to the possibility of back injury, the head must be immobilized. Lifeguards usually tend to ill or injured people until full emergency medical help can come. The importance of the appropriate equipment and knowledge for a lifeguard in how to deal with medical injuries and emergencies in these first stages cannot be stressed too much. Whether it is a straightforward first aid kit or oxygen mask, the lifeguard can use those things to help save a life.

Leave a Reply